Carl Lostritto
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Story of a Line
Five images help tell a cyclical story. It begins with a drawing. This drawing, shown in the first image below, contains a line.
The line is among many other similar lines. They are representing two cubes. One cube passes through a surface from below, another from above.
The line is in another world, but it hasn't moved. This new world is infinitely larger. Reality is made of an additional dimension. The other lines are not even really lines anymore, but colored troughs depressed into a surface–not the surface represented initially, but a surface formerly understood as “the paper.” In the distance, the edge of the paper forms something similar to a horizon. Not a real horizon, which would be the limits of perception. Instead, an artificial horizon resulting from limits of the surface geometry.
The paper–gone and replaced by a ground. Other lines are now strands, which are infinitesimally thin. If viewed from the side, they would not exist. Each occupies a different vertical position in an order. No strand is on the same plane as another.
In three dimensions, crafting a particularly composed two dimensional image is a burden. Support structure can hide so long as the lines recede to a point coincident with the point of view and mass extrudes along the inverse of a vector to the point of view. This world exists entirely in service to one point of view. From that view one can see two cubes. One cube passes through a surface from below, another from above. Only tone and shadows betray the presence of a third dimension.
A line thickened becomes a shape, and a shape extruded becomes a cube, which then extrudes further until it intersects with a surface. Another cube falls into the surface from the other side. When viewed from the other side, the scene would be comprised of two cubes. One cube passes through a surface from below, another from above.