May 11, 2015 Line Weights Script For discussion today: lineweights_2.0.py
May 1, 2015 Phase 3:Corner Building, Assignment and Readings

This is the third and final phase of the course. A site and program will now be introduced. They are not meant to be the subject of inquiry, but devices to further your research. The site and program will provide resistance and motivation, but successfully responding to their forces is only the beginning. They are given, fixed, and fictional (although based on facts). The “big questions” that initiated our work must continue to be addressed: how does drawing mediate/influence/fuel/ disrupt the relationship between you, computing and architecture? When and how can the process of drawing a project become the project? Extend your work from phases one and two and continue to design a design process. Continue to experiment with the relationship between drawing and space. How, with what media, and with what machines you do computation is open. We will consider and discuss the role of automation, indirection, instruments and knowledge under the conceptual umbrella of authorship.

The site and program are a replacement for the existing Post Office and Postal Service warehouse at 25 Dorchester Ave, Boston, MA 02205. The program follows.

The vehicular circulation system around the site is to remain similar to its current configuration. 18 truck loading docks on the publicly inaccessible portion of Dorchester Ave are required. Separate entries for Postal Service personnel and the public are required. As is the case with the existing building, one floor of the warehouse space must be contiguous with the Postal Service Inspection Building to the SouthSouthWest. The boundary of the site may be expanded to include a portion of what is currently the South Station platform and the landscape at the corner of Summer St. and Dorchester St. However, the footprint of the building may not extend beyond its current shape.

The program and site afford many opportunities to advance and question the conception of a corner, the perception of thickness, and multiple conceptions of inside and ourside. Consider, for example, that the public portion of the program could be thought of as an object within the reletively vast landscape of the warehouse. Consider, alternatively, that the public program could be interperted as an excavation out of the perceived solid of the warehouse volume.

In this phase of the course, drawings, by necessity, serve a function: abstraction for the purpose of communication and operation. Many drawings result from projecting three-dimensional geometry onto a two-dimensional picture plane and deploying graphic conventions. However, these drawings are also treated as autonomous works of architecture. Besides conveying something, drawings can be something that can be read, interpreted, and expanded based on its own implied structure. During this phase of the course, students are responsible for creating multiple cycles of movement between drawing and building.

The first order of business is to design and fix a certain set of conditions unqie to each students’ project. Making some early decisions and removing them from the possibility of reconsideration ensures that for the weeks ahead, drawing and computing can be explored with respect to a building rather than working slowly towards a building. We will discuss more about these given conditions, which may include materials, program arrangement, structural systems, spatial grids, and building envelope dimensions.

Readings: Over the course of the remainder of this phase, students will be assigned one reading to master taken from the list of previously provided essays and some new additions:

April 27, 2015 Grasshopper demo definitions made in class today grasshopper defs (ZIP)
April 27, 2015 Python in grasshopper http://www.food4rhino.com/project/ghpython?ufh
April 27, 2015 Thank you Thank you to RISD faculty Hansy Better, Alejandro Borsani, Suzanne Matthew, and Yasmin Vobis for participating today
March 20, 2015 Rhino Curves to HPGL

Here are two versions of the script, a simple and a more advanced, which we discussed in class. See the comments in each for more info.

March 19, 2015 More Rhino Python – drawing on surfaces to draw surfaces

In class today we modified some of the example scripts I made and explored a few new strategies

March 19, 2015 Some example scripts to dissect today
March 17, 2015 Intro to Rhino Python

Super important: the documentation

the code from class today: quickrhino.py (ZIP)

March 13, 2015 Phase 2 readings
March 13, 2015 Phase 2 Breif

Part A . Amass a collection of ten corners; five found and five made. The found corners should all be parts of built architecture, each documented in a single photograph. Print these photographs on 7” x 8” portrait-oriented paper. Identifying corners is easy, so it will be important to maintain high standards during your search. Be prepared to argue for and/or prove that the architect of these corners addressed the corner as a particular “problem” or opportunity. The made corners will be submitted as digital files. Each should be comprised of no more than four surfaces. (In anticipation of questions: No poly-surfaces, no curves and no lines; “Surface” does not mandate nor preclude planarity; Scale and material are not in play. This is an exercise in geometry.)

Part B. After consultation with the studio, identify one made corner. Render this corner with lines–and no other form of mark or tone–on paper. Be sure your system of rendering, which you will design and code, articulates form and allows the reading of form in 3-D space. Then, revisit the model and make changes based on analysis of the drawing. Allow your foreknowledge of the next iteration of rendering to influence the model. Introduce more surfaces if necessary. Render the corner again with lines–and no other form of mark or tone–on paper. Repeat this cycle as many times as you determine to be necessary.

Part C. Revisit your model and make adjustments in anticipation of another rendering, but this time the rendering will be generated by light simulation software rather than articulated in a line drawing. Density of line will now be articulated by the edge of surfaces, so the quantity of those surfaces in the model will likely need to increase substantially. Likely your method of modeling will shift also to include coding to form surfaces. Reference, draw from, and learn from the found corners. Generate a rendering, make adjustments to the model then generate a second rendering.

Part D. Expand your model to include an ambiguous conception of solid/void. Introduce at least one additional corner to assist in achieving this ambiguity, which is to correspond to literary theorist William Empson’s “seventh type.” Consider how depth, line, pattern, shape and surface work together and in relation to one another to create this ambiguity. Render this construct with line and, if necessary, tone using any combination of techniques onto 21”x24” paper (portrait orientation). Produce a diagram that explains the two conflicting readings of solid/void.

Assignment sheet (PDf)

March 2, 2015 Code from today’s class

today in class today I showed:

March 2, 2015 writing about line

Reading these will be helpful at this stage

February 28, 2015 Creating functions and blending between two lines

These two completely unrelated examples might be relevant to many students

February 23, 2015 Software to view HPGL Some good free software for viewing HPGL code and converting HPGL instructions to other formats: Cenon. It does NOT work well for converting other formats into HPGL.
February 23, 2015 Using the Chiplotle library

First of all, make a note of the manual. And Here are two examples of ways to use the library:

February 23, 2015 Chiplotle Configuration File

to access and the file that chiplotle library uses to communicate with plotters:

These are the settings for the Roland Plotters:
baudrate = 9600
bytesize = 7
parity = ‘E’
stopbits = 1
timeout = 1
xonxoff = 1
rtscts = 0

These are the settings for the HP plotter:
baudrate = 9600
bytesize = 8
parity = ‘N’
stopbits = 1
timeout = 1
xonxoff = 1
rtscts = 0

February 21, 2015 more example scripts

these scripts have detailed notes inside them, which should make it easy to follow

curve through points (slightly different from Bezier curve): interpolated_curve.py

using the transform functions and transparency: transparency-and-transformation.py

even if these examples aren’t directly relevant to you, have a look at the portion of the script that saves an image, which will be useful for everyone

February 19, 2015 Code from class today codeexamples (zip)
February 19, 2015 Installing vector file output and pen plotting resources

First, there are two libraries that Chiplotle (the library that allows us control the plotter) requires, (dependancies) which will need to be installed before anything else: Pyserial and Numpy. You will also need the driver for the physical USB-serial adapter.

installing these first three are straightforward installer apps:

The Chiplotle library is slightly more involved, and we’ll do this as a group in class:

This is the Chiplotle documentation site: http://music.columbia.edu/cmc/chiplotle/manual/

February 17, 2015 Examples made in class today basicDrawing
February 16, 2015 basic drawing template script basic_draw.py
February 12, 2015 Python Install Resources
February 12, 2015 Phase 1 Assignment

Part A: Amass a collection of nine examples of drawn lines made by artists, designers and architects. Print them on 7” x 8” sheets of paper and label them with bibliographic source information. Then, choose three kinds lines from your collection. For each, articulate three different methods one could use to recreate those lines for a total of nine articulated methods. Focus on the geometric and aesthetic characteristics of the line. At this stage, don’t be concerned with media, material or tools. Write in English and avoid ambiguity or a reliance on interpretation of your words.

Part B: Choose one kind of line from your selection of three. Alternatively, combine two or more kinds of lines together to form a new hybrid type. Write Python Code to recreate, and then extend, that line. Exact replication of the original line is not important. Allow your interests and the medium to influence the outcome. Begin by drawing in pixels on screen before you transition to controlling a machine that marks paper. Draw your line for multiple durations at multiple scales. Use a fresh piece of paper for each iteration of your line.

Part C: Make an 21”x24” architectural drawing with the 24” side oriented vertically. This drawing should contain multiple–perhaps thousands, perhaps three–iterations of your line. This drawing may elicit representational qualities but will not be overtly keyed to any representational system. It will not be to scale and will not correspond to any subject. Challenge your lines to convey depth and define space. Consider a controlled ambiguity between the 2-D space within the paper and a represented 3-D space perceived in the drawing. Respect the boundary of the page. Move beyond the definition of a drawing as a collection of lines into that of an expressed relationship between lines. How can lines perform collectively? How do they influence each other? As you work, also consider what inherently “architectural” problems your drawing can enlighten. Corners and edges are favorite foundational elements of architecture in this studio, but perhaps other productive “problems” can be articulated and explored.

Full Phase 1 Assignment Sheet (PDF)

February 12, 2015 Syllabus syllabus (PDF)
February 12, 2015 Course Description

This studio explores computer programming as a design medium. Programming, defined as the design and execution of algorithms, allows designers to tap into the science of computing in ways that more fashionable approaches to digital media (parametric modeling, for example) preclude. How programming can and should be used to conceive of architecture is a perpetually open question. Rather than immediately computing architecture, this studio begins by computing drawing, which by definition allows the human eye and mind to play a prominent role in design. Conceptions of authorship, ambiguity, and representation remain the focus of attention and criticism as the course moves from drawing to building (and back to drawing).

The studio, as a community, cultivates an actionable obsession with three foundational elements of architecture: line, surface and corner.

Beginning with a kind of calisthenics in the Python programming language, students control a machine (pen plotter, laser cutter or other) that affects paper by marking line(s). Computed (and computing) lines are sorted, grown, aggregated, tested, indexed, critiqued, extended, constrained, broken, extended, etc. In other words, we draw. The inquiry at this stage includes an analysis of linear precedents in art.

The second phase involves lines in space defined by rendered surfaces and articulated as edges rather than marks. The inquiry at this stage includes an analysis of lines and corners in architecture.

The third phase sees the introduction of an urban site and a 100,000 SF program. This large building will have a small portion (925 SF) that is different than the rest. The exact site and program details are revealed later. Computing in the realm of drawing remains a generative force in this phase. Techniques and languages used to represent the building at this phase will influence details, material, and structure. This is is the third of the “Computing Drawing” series of studios offered in the spring since 2013. Each subsequent studio is heavily influenced by the research, opinions, successes and failures of students in previous studios.

May 22, 2015 Final Review

After the final review we formed a corner and represented it with competing depth cues corner_small

bye! disperse_small

May 21, 2015 Phase 3 final work
Leis Ho

Leis Ho

Jennifer Park

Jennifer Park

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Aashman Goghari

Aashman Goghari

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Daniel Thompson

Daniel Thompson

Eric Dreisbach

Eric Dreisbach

Marco Didonet

Marco Didonet

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Ziyu Su

Ziyu Su

April 30, 2015 Visiting the Drawing Ambience Exhibit at the RISD Museum museum1 wave3
April 24, 2015 Crompton and Webb Visit Dennis Crompton and Michael Webb were in town for events associated with the Drawing Ambience Exhibit at the RISD Museum. We were luck to have them join us for an afternoon of work-in-progress critique.
Photo by Saba Yazdjerdi with Aashman Goghari's work pinned up on the left and Tai's Shaws work on the right. Carl's shoe in the far left corner.

Photo by Saba Yazdjerdi with Aashman Goghari’s work pinned up on the left and Tai’s Shaws work on the right. Carl’s shoe in the far left corner.

April 13, 2015 Phase 2 final work
Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Jennifer Park

Jennifer Park

Eric Dreisbach

Eric Dreisbach

Leis Ho

Leis Ho

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Daniel Thompson

Daniel Thompson

Ziyu Su

Ziyu Su

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Marco Didonet

Marco Didonet

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Aashman Goghari

Aashman Goghari

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

April 13, 2015 Phase 2 work in progress These are some of the drawings and images that were important to the final review conversations today.
Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Leis Ho

Leis Ho

Daniel Thompson

Daniel Thompson

Ziyu Su

Ziyu Su

Sunny Zhang

Ziyu Su

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

April 9, 2015 Phase 2 Part C: rendering with light simulation software
Jennifer Park

Jennifer Park

Daniel Thompson

Daniel Thompson

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Eric Dreisbach

Eric Dreisbach

Eric Dreisbach

Eric Dreisbach

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Aashman Goghari

Aashman Goghari

Ziyu Su

Ziyu Su

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

April 6, 2015 Part 2B Pin Up
The pin up (partial view)

The pin up (partial view)

Aashman Goghari

Aashman Goghari’s grown lines contain corners (and work together to form a master corner?)

Ziyu Su's corner is in and out and smooth and striated  (1 of 2)

Ziyu Su’s corner is in and out and smooth and striated (1 of 2)

Ziyu Su's corner is in and out and smooth and striated  (2  of 2)

Ziyu Su’s corner is in and out and smooth and striated (2 of 2)

Sunny Zhang's corners are extra sharp at the corner

Sunny Zhang’s corners are extra sharp at the corner

Sunny Zhang's corner drawn with rigid pen

Sunny Zhang’s corner drawn with rigid pen

Sunny Zhang's corner drawn with wobbly pen

Sunny Zhang’s corner drawn with wobbly pen

Tai Shaw's corner is a building fluid of lines anticipating the corner

Tai Shaw’s corner is a building fluid of lines anticipating the corner

Saba Yazjerdi renders the corner by denying the corner

Saba Yazjerdi renders the corner by denying the corner

Mengcen Shen's two corners that are one, in a way. This drawing launched the epic, "what is going on with Mengcen's corners" conversation that will go down in Computing Drawing History...(and launched the Computing Drawing Analogical Film Series)

Mengcen Shen’s two corners that are one, in a way. This drawing launched the epic, “what is going on with Mengcen’s corners” conversation that will go down in Computing Drawing History…(and launched the Computing Drawing Analogical Film Series)

Marco Didonet's surface over surface

Marco Didonet’s surface over surface

Jennifer Park's thick (thick into the view) surface

Jennifer Park’s thick (thick into the view) surface

Eric Dreisbach's lost drawing of surfaces in surfaces (it fell behind the heater during pin down. We think it is gone until the next major BEB renovation)

Eric Dreisbach’s lost drawing of surfaces in surfaces (it fell behind the heater during pin down. We think it is gone until the next major BEB renovation)

Chris Beck - Drawing from a Moving Point of View

Chris Beck – Drawing from a Moving Point of View

Chris Beck - Drawing from a Moving Point of View

Chris Beck – Drawing from a Moving Point of View

Chris Beck's moving point of view

Chris Beck’s moving point of view

March 21, 2015 Phase 1 Review Thank you Laura Briggs, Mimi Cabell, Kai Franz, Cas Holman and Stefanie Pender for joining our phase 1 review.
Kai Franz reads Sunny Zhang's drawing

Kai Franz reads Sunny Zhang’s drawing

March 21, 2015 Phase 1 Final Drawings
Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Marco Didonet

Marco Didonet

Marco Didonet

Marco Didonet

Eric Dreisbach

Eric Dreisbach

Eric Dreisbach

Eric Dreisbach

Leis Ho

Leis Ho

Leis Ho

Leis Ho

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Ziyu Su

Ziyu Su

Ziyu Su

Ziyu Su

Ziyu Su

Ziyu Su

Daniel Thompson

Daniel Thompson

Daniel Thompson

Daniel Thompson

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny  Zhang

Sunny Zhang

March 21, 2015 Phase 1 work in progress
Chris Beck

Chris Beck testing overlapping lines

Chris Beck

Chris Beck’s masking in progress

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa’s draft drawing

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa draft drawing close up

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw’s draft drawing

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen’s extremely long horizon

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen’s extremely long horizon closeup

Daniel Thompson

Daniel Thompson tests laser cutting lines

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi’s test sheet

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi test sheet closeup

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi test sheet very closeup

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang sketching line algorithm

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang test sheet

Sunny Zhang's draft drawing

Sunny Zhang’s draft drawing

Sunny Zhang's draft drawing

Sunny Zhang’s draft drawing

March 5, 2015 Work from part B
Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Sunny Zhang

Tzu Yu Su

Tzu Yu Su

Aashman Goghari

Aashman Goghari

Leis Ho

Leis Ho

Leis Ho

Leis Ho

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Chris Beck

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Tai Shaw

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Mengcen Shen

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

Ameer Musa

Saba Yazdjerdi

Saba Yazdjerdi